Count Your Blessings — Count The Omer

After celebrating the liberation from slavery we should take time to see the multiple blessings which the Bore has provided for His children.

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To remember

period between Passover & Shavuot =  one of the most spiritually powerful times of the year.

to evaluate our lives and our actions > Sefirat HaOmer =  period of ‘Counting the Omer’.

Beginning second day of Passover > Torah commands to count 49 days leading up to festival of Shavuot = celebration of our receiving Torah at Mount Sinai. [Lev 23:15] <= rabbinic tradition > purpose of count = spiritually bridge holidays of Passover and Shavuot.

counting of the Omer ends this year on May 19th, followed by Shavuot on May 20th.

escape from Egypt – physical freedom — time remaining to prepare ourselves to receive the Torah – Shavuot – spiritual freedom.

link between two festivals = agricultural => sacrifice called omer = a sheaf of barley offered in the Temple >  beginning of  harvest season. Fifty days later, on Shavuot > new wheat offering concluding celebration of grain harvest.

Counting the omer = for ethical self-analysis

Be grateful. Count your blessings. Treat others well. Make every day count. Be kind. Take a full accounting of yourself. Be generous. Use gentle speech. Be compassionate. Remind yourself how to be a better person.

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Preceding

In God’s abounding goodness able to grow and spreading kindness by counting the Omer

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Additional reading

  1. Two forms of Freedom
  2. To be chained by love for another one
  3. A world with or without religion
  4. Looking to the East and the West for Truth
  5. Being Religious and Spiritual 8 Spiritual, Mystic and not or well religious
  6. Background to look at things
  7. An anarchistic reading of the Bible—(1) Approaching the Bible
  8. Nature Is A Reflection Of God
  9. From nothingness to a growing group of followers of Jeshua 2 To Please God
  10. Christian fundamentalists feeding Into the Toxic Partisanship and driving countries into the Dark Ages… #1
  11. A New Perspective
  12. Trusting, Faith, Calling and Ascribing to Jehovah #10 Prayer #8 Condition
  13. Not trying to make the heathen live like Jews #2
  14. Self-development, self-control, meditation, beliefs and spirituality
  15. A Passover for unity in God’s community
  16. Actions to be a reflection of openness of heart
  17. Don’t Envy the World
  18. If we view the whole world through a lens that is bright

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Related articles

  1. Considering that…
  2. Three Words of Freedom
  3. “All I need is a King James Bible and a dictionary.”
  4. Sticky Note to God 06.08.16 Thank you for lightening my path
  5. Sticky Note to God ~03.27.19~ the freedom You permitted me
  6. Knowing
  7. F ~ Freedom

Ahava: A Spiritual Experience in the Jewish Tradition

Be grateful. Count your blessings. Treat others well. Make every day count. Be kind. Take a full accounting of yourself. Be generous. Use gentle speech. Be compassionate. Remind yourself how to be a better person.

Count the Omer…

We are now in the period between Passover and Shavuot, one of the most spiritually powerful times of the year. During this time, we are supposed to evaluate our lives and our actions. This period of time is known as the period of ‘Counting the Omer’. Beginning on the second day of Passover, the Torah commands us to count 49 days leading up to the festival of Shavuot, the celebration of our receiving the Torah at Mount Sinai. [Lev 23:15]

For those who have not been counting, today is the 12th day of the Omer. It also happens to be the 12th day of April, which makes counting the Omer particularly easy…

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Symptom of tzara’at a white spot on the flesh

  זֹאת תּוֹרַת אֲשֶׁר בּוֹ נֶגַע צָרָעַת . . . בְּטָהֳרָתוֹ: (ויקרא יד:לב) This is the law regarding someone suffering from a lesion of tzara’at . . . when he is to be purified. Leviticus 14:32 * If the person formerly afflicted with tzara’at could not afford the lambs required for his sacrifices, he could [...]

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Going up to 14 Nisan, time to consider if are body or health is not gone out of control

On Purim, Let’s Get Vulnerable

Does eating and drinking to much fit in with our celebration of Purim, a holiday of rejoice and redemption?

Being an introvert doesn’t mean you have to be isolated at Purim

Jennifer Einstein, a lifelong Reform Jew and introvert, claims that dressing as Mordechai, in sackcloth and ashes, was her best Purim costume ever. When it comes to practicing Judaism, she sometimes asked herself: How can I take part in a communal religion when being around people can be so draining? Purim can be a particularly [...]

Making time for God is crucial

Growing and getting knowledge demands time. With the Bible, the Bestseller of all times we have the best guidebook for our life. We must take time to read and study it, getting to know why everything is this way, what to do and how to build up our life, in the most successful way.

How to Read the Bible

Though even the Bible speaking in an ancient Voice the Most High Creator took care that His Words would spread all over the world and would reach the many different peoples in a language they can understand.

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To be careful and to remember

John Walton writes

God … adopted the language of the culture to communicate in terms they understood.

or “we could say incarnated Himself” writes who regularly preaches at Bethany Community Church.  With that incarnation he probably does mean something different than what we would understand by bringing life into His Word. Naturally we do know the Almighty never incarnated into something or some one. But what God provided, was that God His Word came to the people

“in the language of the culture to communicate in terms they understood.”

or, as John Walton puts it,

“[The Bible’s] message transcends the culture in which it originated, but the form in which the message was imbedded was fully permeated by the ancient culture.”

We should believe the Bible is authoritative, and we should take the words of those 66 different books as containing all the necessary.

We may never forget that

We need to be open to letting the Bible speak in its own voice, not in ours.

This is so often forgotten by lots of people, who prefer to take all those added notes by theologians as more telling than the words in the bible text itself.

When reading the Bible we should know that we have God’s Word in our hands and that we should open our ears to what He is saying.  We should be humble enough not to think human beings who went to a theological college would know it better than Him. Reading the Bible is a way of  hearing God’s word when we are prepared to have our ears and eyes open for what the Most High wants to tell and show us.

We do have to allow Scripture to guide us on what to do and how to serve the Most High. Whatever happens and whenever in our life we can turn to the Bible. In times of sadness, joy, worry or bereavement there is He Who wants to talk to us. It is up to us to be willing to hear what God has to say.

Being humble with our interpretations, because we aren’t perfect, we always should remember that god’s Word is perfect and does not need any adding by human beings.

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Continues with:

How to Read the Bible (sequel 1)

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Find also to read:

  1. Absolute Basics to Reading the Bible
  2. Words of God to stand and to be followed and to believe

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{ Andrew Mills }

itsownvoice.pngToday, in a short blog post, we are going to try to dive pretty deep theologically and philosophically. I want to begin with a quote from a pretty well-known Biblical scholar at Wheaton, named John Walton, who apparently Larry went to school with, which makes me quite jealous.

Walton writes this, “We must notice that when God wanted to talk to the Israelites about their intellect, emotions, and will, he did not revise their ideas of physiology and feel compelled to reveal the function of the brain. Instead, he adopted the language of the culture to communicate in terms they understood.”

For me, that last line is incredibly important… “[God] adopted” – or we could say incarnated Himself – “in the language of the culture to communicate in terms they understood.” What this means is that the message of the Bible is imbedded and formed by the ancient cultures of…

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