On the 75th yahrtzeit of Levi Yizchack Schneerson passing this world

Today, Wednesday, the 20th day of the Jewish month of Menachem Av (August 21), marks 75 years since the untimely passing of Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneerson, of righteous memory, father of the Rebbe, of righteous memory. Rabbi , was respected as one of the greatest Talmudic and Kabbalistic scholars of his generation. He served as [...]

Second core value of Conservative Judaism opposite use of native tongue in Reform Judaism

Hebrew as the irreplaceable language of Jewish expression is the second core value of Conservative Judaism. According to them its existence is coterminous with that of the Jewish people and the many layers of the language mirror the cultures in which Jews perpetuated Judaism. It was never merely a vehicle of communication, but part of [...]

Poetry and Urban Change

    1. power of Emperor
    2. power of Church
  • no more escape for poets > fight against witches + burning of heretics.
  • Ancientlibraryalex.jpg
    Nineteenth century artistic rendering of the Library of Alexandria by the German artist O. Von Corven, based partially on the archaeological evidence available at that time.

    with making of religion of the Empire, Christianity led to destruction of Library of Alexandria = most famous library of Classical antiquity = Alexandrian Museum (Mouseion, “shrine of the Muses”).

  • astronomy special target of flaming intolerance
  • dark ages > Umayyads, penetrating into Spain, to bring back conscience books of astronomy survived in Arabic translations => Alhambra, palace + fortress of  Moorish monarchs of Granada, Spain = center of full ferment for translations + spread of knowledge.
  • expulsion of Jews + Arabs from Spain,  persecution of Cathars, Waldensians + Albigensians in the whole Europe.
  • All power against wishful thought of poetry > poetry = inextinguishable force. > legacy collected + transmitted through hermetic compositions of alchemists opposed to power of Rome => historical expressions of Reformation +  Enlightenment derived

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Preceding

Where our life journey begins and inheritance of offices of parents

Marranism or the Invisibles

Fondazione M

a fragment from the essay published in Academicus XX:

During the Middle Age and until the Renaissance, power is represented by the two eagles: the power of the Emperor and the power of the Church. There is no more escape for the poets: and the effects is given by the fight against witches, and the burning of heretics. Already with the making of religion of the Empire, Christianity had led to the destruction of the Library of Alexandria and the suppression of the Olympic Games. All the books dealing with astronomy were the special target of the flaming intolerance of the unique power of the two swords. In the dark ages, the uncertain light has been coming through the Umayyads, penetrating into Spain, to bring back that conscience that since the unification of religion and empire, it was been removed in Europe: even considered lost, the books of astronomy survived…

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Marranism or the Invisibles

To remember

  • personalities portrayed showing same hand’s gesture > showing traditional gesture of benediction = birkhat cohanim = traditional (regular) sign of Israel’s tradition.
  • sign as reference > Israel’s inherithors lose birthright to be considered part of mystical body of Israel after conversion to Catholicism or (especially in Eastern countries) to Islam

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Preceding

Where our life journey begins and inheritance of offices of parents

Fondazione M

The personalities portrayed are showing the same hand’s gesture. Maybe, we should be able to explain what does it mean that gesture, and the better way can be to show the traditional gesture of benediction, which is the following one: as you can see, the birkhat cohanim, the benediction sign is given posing a division between the fingers two by two, exceptioning the thumb. It is to say that it is not a natural gesture, because that division can not be obtained without have reference with the will to impress that shape.

birkah cohanim gesture

This is the traditional (regular) sign of Israel’s tradition. If so, what about the former? The composition of the second and third finger in distance from the index and the little finger is even more difficult than the regular division, and many people are not able at all in performing it, if they don’t hold on with…

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A Secret of our Enemy :Inter-Ethnic Fault Lines Among the Jews (Full Article)

The broigus or the non-willingness to talk to the other-one or enemy, has created more non-understanding and ridiculous division instead of co-operation or acceptance of differences.

Still today there is perhaps even more exclusion in Judaism and unnecessary isolation and exclusion, instead of getting to know each other more and working together as equals working for and showing the same love for the Same One True God.

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To remember

  •  Jews survived + adapted by holding firmly to their defensive creed
  • Jews complaining > their communities suffering from inter-ethnic + intergenerational conflict.
  • modern Ashkenazi Jews developed peculiar way of expressing anger at one another => makes our family quarrels unusually prolonged + bitter. > demand more justice of others than prepared to offer => quarrels = so obdurate because desire more justice than available in this world.
  • Quarrelers = adept at enmeshing the unwary.
  • In most cultures an angry person longs to unload his rage on the wrongdoer > Jewish quarreler, in contrast, prides him or herself on not talking to the offender > elaborate endlessly to anyone on the injustice he’s suffered—with the crucial exception of the putative wrongdoer.
  • broigus = “a fight where people won’t talk to each other.” > Not talking = most distinguishes Jewish quarrel from all other kinds
  • absence of contact with the alleged wrongdoer, quarrels become obdurate => quarrel becomes a theodicy
  • quarrelsomeness =  Jewish fate > biblical books + rabbinic literature replete with admonitions against stiff-necked pride.
  • Ashkenazi quarrel =/= fate = pronounced moral/theological dimension that makes it appear that way.
  • having possession = experienced as a proxy for a permanent + living closeness
  • hahamim in some Sephardic Jewish communities > contrasts with  contemporary Ashkenazi rabbinate who tend to duck out when the swinging starts. > struggle for dominance within a family is ancient + ubiquitous, but  willingness to destroy the family in pursuit of it is not.
  • Other quarrelsome cultures tend to focus on outsiders (the IRA versus Britain) or nonfamilial rivals (competing Mafia families).
  • sources of Jewish inwardness = anti-Semitism on the one side (including the inheritance of the Holocaust), + excesses of modern Jewish piety on the other.
  • Anti-Semitism leaves Jews with no obvious point of escape: => secular + religious Jews feel compelled to view their origin as a burdensome fate + their brethren as source of their problem. => In their desire to free themselves from Jew-hatred, Jews turn their bitterness on—other Jews.
  • salient features of Jewish quarrel in Holy Land—inwardness, sternness, shunning, claim to own the faith and its history implied in the very terms “Orthodox” + “Haredim,” > will to self-destruction = remarkably similar to  Ashkenazi quarrels among secular Jews in the West.
  • nasty feuds regularly kicked off within synagogues by disgruntled congregants anxious to disengage themselves from a rabbi—often a learned, decent man, + almost never one so base or negligent as to deserve the public humiliation his congregants dish out.
  • Family peace requires placing tensions + dissatisfactions native to family life in a larger frame.
  • Jewish communal institutions have lost ability to curb disastrous secularization of pious impulses. > rabbinate dependent on wealthy donors + too exposed to forces of the Jewish quarrel, to dare the attempt.
  • Ashkenazi quarrel = outcome of approaching inheritance + other family matters with a misplaced religious zeal.
  •  quarrel = shadow of Ashkenazi Judaism

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Preceding

Where our life journey begins and inheritance of offices of parents

The Numen Matrix

With Military Quotes

-Full Article Below –

Introduction: There is the famous Jewish saying, “if one of us is attacked, all of us are attacked.” On the one hand this culturally accepted twist of logic is their strength, but on the other hand it is their weakness. The white culture does not have this ethos, rather we are more guided by the principle of logos, which ultimately accepts reason as supreme over the official or cultural law of the land. Jews survived and adapted by holding firmly to their defensive creed, white culture survived and adapted by always holding reason and logic as something that could ignore and surpass all former tradition or codified law. However this leaves white culture under threat from the Jews among us who operate primarily for the benefit of Jewish interests, hence as parasites.

In a recent article from Tablet magazine we read of Jews…

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Where our life journey begins and inheritance of offices of parents

"Our own life journeys begin where the previous generation's journey ends, and this is the case throughout all the generations. This means that our own personal journeys began long ago, "along the Jordan from Beit Yeshimot to Avel Shittim, in the plains of Moav," (ibid 33:49) Israel's final point of departure in the wilderness. Together [...]

Jews of Cuba

The Jews of Cuba “struggled to survive after the revolution,” says Mayra Levy, the president of Havana’s Hebrew Sephardic Center. About 95 percent of Cuba’s Jews — some 15,000 people — left the island in 1959, following Fidel Castro’s revolution against dictator Fulgencio Batista. The Jewish exodus was fueled by Castro’s attacks on capitalism, in which Jews, [...]

Fallen angels and pagan ideas food for stories

Mankind may find the cradle of civilization in Mesopotamia which gave us a treasure of many valuable inventions, discoveries and stories. Many may say that it was here that agriculture began, but they should know that already long before that age, people tried to cultivate the earth to extract edible products from it. Several people [...]

Humanity vs. Divinity: The Role of Religious Perspective in The Epic of Gilgamesh and Beowulf

To remember

Beowulf preparing to cut off the head of the monster Grendel, illustration from Hero-Myths & Legends of the British Race, 1910.
  • Throughout history, civilizations largely defined by their practiced religions;
  • religion often influences both societal structure of a civilization + how it chooses to record its own history.
  • examining ancient poems The Epic of Gilgamesh and Beowulf reflect religious ideologies of Sumerian and Anglo-Saxon civilizations
  • Epic of Gilgamesh highlights importance of Gilgamesh’s humanity during his journey for eternal life, reflecting ideologies of polytheistic Sumer,
  • Beowulf proclaims Beowulf’s faith in God as reason for his success as warrior + king, reflecting ideologies of Anglo-Saxon Christianity.
  • religious justification of Gilgamesh & Beowulf’s royalty highlights significant historical difference in how both texts were affected by the religions of their regions,
  • Epic of Gilgamesh >narrator uses ideologies of ancient Mesopotamian polytheism to justify King Gilgamesh’s reign over the city of Uruk.
  • role of Beowulf as King of the Geats justified through values of Anglo-Saxon Christianity,< Beowulf claims leadership = result of his unfaltering loyalty to God rather than his own accomplishments.
  • Beowulf = similar to Gilgamesh > exhibits superhuman feats of strength > holds no divine ancestry >> divine aspect of his rule = faith in God. (battle with the dragon threatening the Geats)
  • Gilgamesh serves as his own source of divine right, drawing a further distinction between the two heroes in the way that their humanity is represented by each text’s author.
  • Epic of Gilgamesh places importance on humane over the divine
  • author of Beowulf places importance on the divine over the humane.
  •  Gilgamesh questions mortality + seeks out Utanapishtim, sole survivor of the great flood,
  • Utanapishtim insinuates that death is not a monumental experience; all things must die eventually, + dying is no more consequential than sleeping. => Gilgamesh finds solace in ephemerality of life + embraces his humanity.
  • => focus taken from divinity + placed on humanity
  • in Sumer during time of polytheism = life heavily centered around the gods.

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Preceding

Stories of the beginnings, and one Main book composed of four major sections

Gilgamesh

Between gods and animals: becoming human in the Gilgamesh epic

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Additional reading

  1. Genesis Among the Creation Myths
  2. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 2 Mythic theme 1 God or gods warning
  3. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 3 Mythic theme 2 Hebrew story of the flood
  4. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 6 European myths
  5. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 8 South America

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Related

  1. Chronological timeline of English literature (Oxford)
  2. Men, Monsters and Library Book Hoards: The Lay of the MA Dissertation
  3. Top 3 Medieval Tales to Read and Why
  4. Gaining Appreciation for a Epic of Old English
  5. Tolkien was right: Scholars conclude Beowulf likely the work of single author
  6. ll. 53-85
  7. ll. 164-188

Undergrad Lit Review

Throughout history, civilizations have been largely defined
by their practiced religions; religion often influences both the societal
structure of a civilization and how it chooses to record its own history. By examining how the ancient poems The Epic of Gilgamesh and Beowulf reflect the religious ideologies
of Sumerian and Anglo-Saxon civilizations, where the poems respectively
originated, a greater understanding of how religion has been historically used
in literature to accentuate the power of a nation’s ruler – in this case
Gilgamesh and Beowulf themselves – can be achieved. However, it is imperative
that the differing religious perspectives of each poem’s author are considered
in order to fully understand the significance of this religious accentuation. While
The Epic of Gilgamesh highlights the
importance of Gilgamesh’s humanity during his journey for eternal life, reflecting
the ideologies of polytheistic Sumer, Beowulf
proclaims Beowulf’s faith in God as the reason for his success as…

View original post 1,154 more words

Between gods and animals: becoming human in the Gilgamesh epic

To remember

  • The Epic of Gilgamesh = Babylonian poem composed in ancient Iraq, millennia before Homer = tells story of Gilgamesh, king of the city of Uruk.
  • gods create a friend for him > Enkidu, wild man,
  • woman Shamhat seduces Enkidu=> transforming Enkidu from beast to man => strength diminished + intellect expanded =>able to think + speak like a human being.
  • Enkidu goes to Uruk to confront Gilgamesh’s abuse of power > wrestle with one another => form passionate friendship.
  • Gilgamesh’s beginning number of different editions <= began as cycle of stories in  Sumerian language > collected + translated into single epic in Akkadian language. > earliest version of the epic written in dialect Old Babylonian > revised + updated in Standard Babylonian dialect
  • Gilgamesh story comes to us as a tapestry of shards, pieced together by philologists to create a roughly coherent narrative
  • newest discovery = tiny fragment lain overlooked in museum archive of Cornell University in New York, identified by Alexandra Kleinerman & Alhena Gadotti + published by Andrew George in 2018. => tablet seemed to preserve parts of both Old Babylonian + Standard Babylonian version, = two scenes not identical,
  • Gods depicted as opposite of animals = omnipotent + immortal
  • human placed somewhere in the middle = not omnipotent, but capable of

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Preceding

Stories of the beginnings, and one Main book composed of four major sections

Gilgamesh

++

Additional reading

  1. Genesis Among the Creation Myths
  2. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 2 Mythic theme 1 God or gods warning
  3. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 3 Mythic theme 2 Hebrew story of the flood
  4. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 6 European myths
  5. The flood, floods and mythic flood stories 8 South America

Recortes de Oriente Medio

Tablet V of the Epic of Gilgamesh Tablilla V de la Epopeya de Gilgamesh. Museo Sulaymaniyah, Irak. Foto: Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin / Wikimedia Commons

Por Sophus Helle
Publicado originalmente en Aeon bajo liciencia Creative Commons

The Epic of Gilgamesh is a Babylonian poem composed in ancient Iraq, millennia before Homer. It tells the story of Gilgamesh, king of the city of Uruk. To curb his restless and destructive energy, the gods create a friend for him, Enkidu, who grows up among the animals of the steppe. When Gilgamesh hears about this wild man, he orders that a woman named Shamhat be brought out to find him. Shamhat seduces Enkidu, and the two make love for six days and seven nights, transforming Enkidu from beast to man.

View original post 1,290 more words

Gilgamesh

To remember

  • Gilgamesh Mesopotamian half god & half man > wreaks havoc in town fighting  conquering women.
  • people upset => ask the gods to do something about it => gods create Enkidu = match = almost as strong as Gilgamesh
  • sacred bull killed by Enkidu + Gilgamesh => Enkidu is poisoned.
  • Gilgamesh searches for immortality > meets Utnapishtim.
  • Gilgamesh similarities to bible & greek mythology

Diamonds or Light?

In Mesopotamia Gilgamesh is half god and half man. He is the most handsome man. He wreaks havoc in the town fighting and conquering the women. The people are upset and ask the gods to do something about it. The gods create Enkidu so Gilgamesh has a match. Enkidu is almost as strong as Gilgamesh, but when they fight Gilgamesh wins. Gilgamesh and Enkidu travel and have to fight Humbaba so they can be remembered throughout history. They defeat him. A god sends down the sacred bull. Enkidu and Gilgamesh kill it. The goddess of love tries to seduce Gilgamesh, but he does not marry her. One of them has to die for killing the sacred bull and it is Enkidu. He is poisoned. Gilgamesh searches for immortality. He meets Utnapishtim. Utnapishtim says humans cannot be immortal but he was granted immortality after a flood that wiped away most of…

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Stories of the beginnings, and one Main book composed of four major sections

For centuries humanity has wondered how the world came into existence and how and why it is that there is so much suffering in this world. Many sought the cause of beings or gods existing outside of humanity while the Torah focuses on just one God Who would be the Cause of everything.

Egypt, Moshe and Those who never felt they belonged there

Along the Nile River the river’s annual flooding ensured reliable, rich soil for growing crops. Having people cultivating the lands around this rich water made that in ancient North-eastern Africa the Egyptian civilization coalesced around 3150 BCE (according to conventional Egyptian chronology) with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under the first pharaoh [...]

2019 Purim March 20

Remembering the day many years ago, Jehovah God delivered His people from slaughter from the wicked Haman in the days of Queen Esther of Persia.

God letting us having a look into His Mind

When looking at the ancient writings which form the Kitvei HaKodesh we may notice how the Bore allows us to have a look into His Mind.