Importance of Tikkun olam

The Hebrew phrase tikkun olam (pronounced tee-KOON oh-LUHM) means "world repair." In modern Jewish circles, tikkun olam has become synonymous with the notion of social action and the pursuit of social justice. Created in the image of God each human being is requested to come close to the Bo're and to be a partaker of a marvellous peaceful world to which each member has to contribute out of free will. In order for the balance between good and evil intended by God to be restored, humans must be involved in the world's reparation and can not keep aside or aloof or 'do nothing' to get social justice or a better world.

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Tikkun or fixing… happiness or misery… the invisible dynamic

Tikkun entails more than putting something right what was wrong. We should look more at it as a word presenting the healing factor or bringing something in a good or healthy state.

In Europe we still speak about correcting or reacting in the good sense to something to repair it. Some may use the word to fix something, but we doubt this word would be used in our regions in the sense of tikkun.

energy healing

Tikkun is a Hebrew word, means correction.

I am yet to hear a Westerner, or an Easterner use the word: correction. The world, nowadays, is into “fixing”. ((In your vocabulary, each word should mean what it actually mean… If you use words that are close, but mean something different, you can see that in your Starting Point Measurements, in the vocabulary measure… your number will be low… signifying that for you everything is the same as everything else, except that not always… a low ability to differentiate between things. You’ll misinterpret what you hear/read, you’ll misunderstand things, follow things poorly, you’ll have a lot of pain and little happiness.))

Fixing is an ugly world, immediately signaling what the speaker sees, that there is something wrong and it urgently needs to be fixed, because it is wrong that it is. Reactive.

But when emotions run high, the cone of vision narrows…

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